December 21, 2009

Mummy Was A Robot, Daddy Was A Small Non-Stick Kitchen Utensil

This post now resides on my other site 50 Watts:



33 comments:

  1. Brilliant stuff. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It was one of my favorite childhood books. Thanks a lot!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great illustrations. We love robots.

    ReplyDelete
  4. interesting... my dad was a non-stick kitchen utensil too..

    ReplyDelete
  5. Love how the robot has an abacus in her brain...how hi-tech!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great stuff - and a near-reference to Quiet Sun in the title too...!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow... When I one day put together my Floydian prog rock group, we'll have to look into acquiring these for liner art.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Just wondering if you've received permission to scan and post these illustrations? These are the property of the artists themselves. It's wonderful to be publicizing the work of these little-known artists, but not necessarily to be using their work without permission.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I remember reading this book as kid. I got it from the local library.

    ReplyDelete
  10. There's no copyright infringement if you scanned the se images right from the original printing from the Soviet State-runned publishing house. USSR was proclaimed in 1922 as meant for the world, and the properties of that former state now do belong to the world.

    ReplyDelete
  11. And there is a thing called 'fair use' Kelly. These images weren't reproduced for profit so the scans are legal.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thanks for all the kind comments. (And Peter, always nice to find another fan of Quiet Sun.)

    Steven Heller featured a cool book today in his "Daily Heller" column: Russian Artists and the Children's Books 1890 - 1992. If I wasn't trying to get out of debt from buying books like "Hello, I'm Robot" I would buy this $195 monster immediately.

    Will

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thanks for another round of great illustrations - I love your blog!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Superb illustrations. I didn't know you were on flickr - I'll go across and look at your photos.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hey Will,

    FYI - http://gizmodo.com/5432146/beautiful-soviet-childrens-books-make-me-wish-i-was-born-behind-the-iron-curtain

    -Set

    ReplyDelete
  16. OMG! what a fantastic post and great finds.

    A friend just sent me a link to your blog, this is unbelievable. Can't wait to fully peruse your selections! and learn about all sorts of cool stuff.

    ReplyDelete
  17. PS. Love the post title. Hilarious.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Aw, I was hoping it was an 801 reference and not a Quiet Sun reference. (Sorry, 801 was the better band!)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I need to hear the 801 version now. I wound up with the Quiet Sun record in high school (don't remember how or why) and think of it fondly without ever actually playing it.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Fantastic. I can't wait to see the rest of your new collection!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Wow -it's like Bloc-meets-Lichtenstein filtered through Metropolis. Truly imaginative, gorgeous work.

    And to think I just wrote a blog today touching on steampunk and contemporary reinvention issues in art. So glad I came across this! Thanks for it!!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Great site, you've put together a real treasure trove of unheard of inspirations. Amazing how much the art establishment and educational institutions stick to a handful of familiar European and American names, leaving whole continents of fantastic illustration unexplored or even considered. Kind of ironic that every single bookstore or art you walk into (ok, as an American) has volumes of 'classic' Japanese block prints from the 1700s but absolutely nothing from Japan in the 1900s... not here though, leave no stone unturned!
    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  23. Pure nostalgia for some, I guess. Haven't seen these before and so my thanks to the poster. The artwork oozes a kind of innocent simplicity, in spite of the rather complex subject, that is surprising.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I get a little weepy when I see a gentle robot admiring a butterfly. Thanks for sharing! Best, S

    ReplyDelete
  25. Reminiscent of the illustrations for "The Cyberiad" by Stanislav Lem

    ReplyDelete
  26. Thanks for share,. it's very Brilliant,. Keep share,.

    ReplyDelete
  27. that fifth one is actually an automaton that was created by jacques de vaucanson in the 18th century. it's a duck that "digests" food. tasty, right?
    according to wikipedia, voltaire wrote that "without...the duck of Vaucanson, you have nothing to remind you of the glory of france."
    haha.

    ReplyDelete
  28. beautyful,,, thanks for share

    ReplyDelete
  29. I love progressive sounds specially 801, and matching mole.

    ReplyDelete